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Multisystem IR Remote Control

Review of infrared remote control unit branded Jianisi, Jue Ying, Phottix, etc.
by Gisle Hannemyr
Published: 2009-08-25.

1. Introduction

This is an inexpenive infrared remote control that will work with four different systems (Pentax, Nikon, Canon, and Konica-Minolta).

This unit is sold under a number of different brands, including Jianisi, Jue Ying, Photon and Phottix. Prices vary between vendors (search eBay for this item).

I bought mine on eBay from Hong Kong based ndfotoshop and paid USD 3.49, including postage. In the auction, the unit was branded “Jianisi”, but the unit I received was branded “Jue Ying”. I think all these brands are interchangable.

This inexpensive remote is marketed as a low cost replacement for manufacturerer's dedicated infrared remote controls, such as the Pentax WP, the Nikon ML-L3, and the Canon RC-6.

As far I am able to tell, it is functional equivalent to the original units, but unlike the original Nikon ML-L3 or Canon RC-6, there is no holes in this unit for attaching it to the camera strap.

2. Instructions

As seems to be the norm with Chinese units, the original instructions included in the package are very brief, and sometimes confusing. They tell you very little about how to operate the unit, and leave out important details, such as how you open the battery compartment to change batteries.

Below is an edited version of the instructions that were included in the package. I have corrected punctation and spelling, put strikeout over text that may be misleading for users with some camera models, and added some extra explanations (in square brackets).

To Use the Remote Control

  1. For the first time use, please pull out the plastic separator at the battery holder.
  2. Mount the camera on a tripod or place the camera on a stable, level surface.
  3. Press the button and rotate main command dial until delayed remote or quick response remote is displayed in the control panel. [Turn on the wireless remote control function on your camera. For instructions about how to do this, see your camera's manual, as this vary from model to model. For instance, on a Nikon D80 camera, you press the shooting mode button repeatedly until the symbol for delayed remote or quick response remote is displayed in the camera's LCD panel. On a Canon 300D camera, you press the shooting mode button repeatedly until the symbol for self-timer/remote appears in the camera's LCD panel.]
  4. Aim the transmitter on the remote control at the infrared receiver on the camera ([it is] usually within +/-30 degree of the lens axis, from the left to the right and from the top to the bottom) and press the remote. Outdoors, make sure that the subject is not backlit and that the line of sight between the transmitter and the infrared receiver is not blocked by the lens or other obstacles. [Certain types of fluorescent light may interfere with the signal from the wireless remote. Try to avoid having fluorescent light hitting the receiver directly.]
  5. How the camera focuses and shoots depends on the option selected for your camera's custom setting. For futher information, check your camera's manual.
  6. Infrared cannot be seen by human eyes. So you will see no visible light from the LED on the front end of the remote control when operating.
  7. Battery: CR2025. [See below for instructions about how to open the battery compartment to replace the battery.]

3. General Impression

Infrared remotes, including those made by the camera manufacturer, are very basic units that only fires the shutter once, when you press the button. There is no continuous shooting mode, and usually no way to emulate the half-press click of the main shutter button. (Pentax, however, seems to have found a way around this.)

The remote has a glossy plastic finish. A plastic film protects all new units. Simply peel of the plastic film once you've taken the remote out of its box, remove the plastic separator the prevents the battery from discharging when the unit is stored, and it is ready to use. There is no on-off switch.

The buttons on the unit are membrane buttons. This is not the most durable of technologies, but at least in my case, this is not an item that will see constant use.

I have only tested it with Nikon and Canon cameras. As far as I am able to tell, it works as advertised.

4. Operation

As you can see from the photo, the unit's control panel is divided in four different segments, marked (from top to bottom) “P”, “N”, “C” and “KM”. This is for the four different camera systems the unit will work with. For details, see notes for each system, below.

Remote control.
Jue Ying multisystem remote control.

Pentax (P)

See compatibility chart for models the unit is compatible with.

The Pentax segment on the remote control consists of two buttons labeled “S” and “W/T”.

On a compatible camera, pressing the “S”-button trips the shutter.

To make sure that a Pentax DSLR focus before firing the shutter, you must enable the AF with Remote option in the custom setting menu, and also make sure it is in single drive mode (AF-S).

The “W/T”-button will let you zoom in and out on a compatible Pentax Optio compact camera. This button cannot be used with a SLR or DSLR camera.

The Pentax compatibility has not been tested by me, but it has been tested by readers, who report that it works well with the Pentax models listed as compatible, as well as some others.

Readers report that pressing the W/T button in the Pentax area on the remote triggers focusing with the Pentax K-01 and K-5 cameras (this emulates the half-press click to focus). This does not work on the Pentax K-7.

Remote Control WP

Nikon (N)

Tested with a Nikon D80. See compatibility chart for models the unit is compatible with.

The Nikon panel is the simplest one, and only contain a single button, marked “S”. You press this button to remotely trigger the shutter on a compatible Nikon camera.

You select delayed remote mode or quick-response remote on the camera. How you do this depend on the model. On the D70, D70s and D90, you press the remote mode button and rotate the main wheel until the right mode appears in the top display. On the D50 and D80 you just press the remote mode button until the right mode appears in the top display. For Nikon bodies without a dedicated remote mode button (D40, D40x, D60, D3000 and D5000), you select select delayed remote mode or quick-response remote through the shooting mode menu.

In delayed remote mode, the self-timer lamp will light for about two seconds before the shutter is released. In quick-response remote mode, the self-timer lamp will flash after the shutter has been released. If the camera is not pre-focused and is in focus priority mode (on a D80, this is when AF-A or AF-S is selected in autofocus mode), the camera will return to stand-by mode without releasing the shutter if it is unable to lock focus. In manual focus mode, if the camera is in release priority mode (on a D80, this is when AF-C is selected in autofocus mode), or if the camera is pre-focused, the camera will release the shutter without pausing to focus.

Like the Nikon ML-L3 infrared remote control, this remote unit can be used for exposures up to 30 minutes. To do this, select exposure mode M, set whatever aperture you want and set shutter to “bulb”. Then select quick-response remote shooting mode. This will display the shutter time as “––” on the top display. The shutter will open with the first press on the shutter-release button on the remote control, and will close when the button is pressed a second time, or after thirty minutes (whatever happens first).

The D80's IR port is located on the front of the camera, at the one o'clock position, directly above the “D80”-badge. There are reports that infrared remotes work less well without a direct line of sight to the camera's IR port, for instance when you are positioned behind the camera. However, testing this in my living room in the evening, the remote worked fine from all positions – front, behind, left and right. If I did't have a line of sight, I just aimed the remote at a wall (my living rom has bright walls) in front of the camera, and the shutter fired.

Bouncing off walls will not work outdoors, where there are no walls the infrared light can bounce off.

Bounce card.
Using a home-made bounce card to fire the remote while standing behind the camera,

To fire the camera from the infrared remote outdoors, while positioned behind the camera, I constructed a simple bounce card from a piece of cardboard, a paper clip, and a brass strip salvaged from a document binder. The home made bounce card in use is shown on the photo to the right.

After fitting the bounce card as shown, I had no problems using the remote while standing behind my D80 and aiming it had the bounce card outdoors, in the sun.

Here is how I constructed the bounce card assembly: The paper clip holds together the cardboard and the brass strip. One end of the brass strip is attached the card, and the other end is fastened between the camera and the tripod plate. The brass is rigid enough to hold the weight of the card, but flexible enough to be bent to position the bounce card in the right place and angle.

Range test.
Maximum range outdoors is approximately 30 meters/100 feet.

No range was given in the specifications for the remote, but Nikon says that their ML-L3 remote has a range of “approximately 16 feet in front of camera” (≈5 meters).

To test the maximum outdoors range of the “Jue Ying” remote, I placed the camera on a tripod and walked away, while trying to trigger the camera with the remote at various distances. The test was conducted in dull weather, and with fresh batteries.

The image to the left shows me standing in the middle of the frame around 30 meters (≈100 feet) away from the camera. This was as far as I could go from the camera, and still be able to fire the shutter.

Canon (C)

Tested with a Canon EOS 300D DSLR and a Powershot G5 compact digicam. See compatibility chart for models the unit is compatible with.

The Canon segment on the remote control consists of two sets of buttons. The top row (labeled “S” and “2S”) is used to remotely trigger the shutter on a DSLR. The second row of buttons (labeled “S”, “W” and “T”) is meant to be used with Canon compact digital cameras.

To be able to use the remote, you select self-timer/remote mode on the camera. On my 300D, this is done with the shooting mode button positioned on the right side on the camera's top panel.

On a compatible DSLR, pressing the “S”-button in the top row trips the shutter immediately. Pressing the “2S”-button introduces a 2-second delay before the shutter is tripped.

Like the Canon RC-6 infrared remote control, this remote unit can be used for exposures up to 150 minutes. To do this, select exposure mode M, set whatever aperture you want and set the shutter speed to “bulb”. Then use the drive mode button to select remote control. The shutter will open with the first press on the shutter-release button on the remote control, and will close when the button is pressed a second time, or after 150 minutes (whatever happens first).

On a compatible compact, pressing the “S”-button in the second row starts the timer that will trip the shutter after some delay.

The “W” and “T” buttons allow wireless remote operation of the built in zoom motor of a compatible Canon compact. “W” to zoom wider, and “T” to zoom towards the tele end.

Konica-Minolta (KM)

[Not tested.]

Konica-Minolta was taken over by Sony in 2006. The unit uses the same infrared protocol as the Minolta RC-3 and will work with a number of legacy models from the Konica-Minolta era. It is also compatible with the Sony α100, which was based on the Konica-Minolta Dynax 5D. See compatibility chart for models the unit is compatible with.

For newer Sony DSLRs, Sony offers the Sony RMT-DSLR1 remote commander (search eBay for this item). This wireless remote is not compatible with those bodies.

The Sony segment on the remote control consists of two buttons labeled “S” and “2S”. On a compatible camera, pressing the “S”-button trips the shutter immediately. Pressing the “2S”-button introduces a 2-second delay before the shutter is tripped.

5. Battery Compartment

There is no on-off switch, so if the unit is stored for a long time with the battery activated, it will discharge. For that reason, I prefer to store it without the battery inserted.

Battery compartment.
Battery compartment pulled half-way out.

It is tricky to open the battery compartment. You have to pull the small square tab (arrow) towards the centre of the remote. At the same time you have to pull the whole battery slot out of the remote. If it feels stuck, just pull the first tab as hard to the centre as you can. I find it easiest to push my thumbnail between this tab and the body of the remote to lever the tab inwards, then using the index finger of the same hand pull the battery compartment out.

It is possible to put the battery compartment in the wrong way. When you are facing the rear of the unit, the square opening tab should be on the left, and the “+” side of the battery should be up. Also see photo above.

6. Compatibility Charts

I received my unit in august 2009. The list of compatible models included in the package appears to be last updated in 2006. I expect that the remote also will work fine with newer camera models not listed that was launched after 2006, that use the same IR protocol.

The compatibility charts below is reproduced verbatim from the package. I have not tried the models listed for compatibility, so I don't know how reliable this data is. The package I received also included a compatibility chart for Olympus. I've left it out. The unit is not advertised as being Olympus-compatible, nor is it. (Yes, I've testet.)

Remote Control for Pentax

Here is the compatibility chart for Pentax that came with the unit:

Pentax*ist DS*ist DS2*ist DL*ist DL2
K100DK110DK10D 
Optio S6/S60Optio S5z/S5n/S5IOptio S4i/S4Optio SV/SVi
Optio 550/500Optio 750ZOptio 330/430(rs) 
*istMZ-6 

Readers have verified that it is compatible with some newer Pentax camera models newer camera models that can be triggered by the Pentax WP infrared remote, such as K-7, K-5, K-x, K-r, K-30, Q and K-01.

Remote Control for Nikon

Note that the Nikon 3100, Dx00-series (D100 – D300, D700) and Dx-series (D1 – D3) does not have an IR port and will not work with any IR remote unit.

Here is the compatibility chart for Nikon that came with the unit:

NikonD40D40xD50D60D70D70sD8084008800
F55F65N65F75N75 Nuvis SLite TouchPronea S

I've also verified that is is compatible with newer camera models that can be triggered by the Nikon ML-L3 infrared remote, such as P7000, P7100, D90, D3000, D5000, D5100 and D7000.

Remote Control for Canon

Note that the following Canon DSLRs: 1000D/XS, 1100D/T3, 10D, 20D, 30D, 40D, 50D and 1D-series do not have an IR port and will not work with any IR remote unit.

Here is the compatibility chart for Canon that came with the unit (only the European names are listed for the Rebel-series models):

CanonEOS 300DEOS 350DEOS 400D 
G1G3G5G6S60S70
S1 ISPro1Pro90 IS 
EOS 10EOS 30/33/30VEOS 50/55EOS 100EOS 300VEOS 300X
ELAN 7EOS kiss IIIEOS kiss III LEOS IX300VQD
IXUS Jr/II/IIIRebel T1/T2 Date SureShot Z180u
Z155120Z370Z370Z  

I expect that it will also be compatible with newer camera models that can be triggered by the Canon RC-6 infrared remote, such as EOS 450D/XSi, 500D/T1i, 550D/T2i, 600D/T3i, 60D, 5DII and 7D.

Remote Control for Konica-Minolta (Sony)

Konica-Minolta A mount cameras were marketed as Dynax in Europe, Maxxum in the USA, and Alpha in Japan. Similarly, Minolta compacts were marketed as Riva in Europe, Freedom in the USA, and Capios in Japan. To save space, I've only listed the European names in my reproduction of compatibility chart that came with the unit:

Konica-Minolta
/ Sony
α100DiMAGE F100DiMAGE F200DiMAGE F300
DiMAGE A200DiMAGE S414DiMAGE S404DiMAGE S304
Dynax 3(L) DateDynax 4 DateDynax 5 Date
Dynax 40Dynax 50 DateDynax 60Dynax 70
Riva Zoom 20Riva Zoom 75WRiva Zoom 115 Date
Riva Zoom 125 DateRiva Zoom 130 
Riva Zoom 140/160(A) 
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21 responses:

Just got mine!

Thank you for this timely information! I just got my remote and there were no instruction included. Your post was very helpful. Going off to try it now, hope it works.

Hi all

I just bought IR Remote (Jue Jing). It is the 5 button one - namely (S), (2S) and (S)-{ (W), (T) for my EOS 350D. Found if I put the camera on timer the remote works, but only from the front, ie: line of sight ...
might help some people ...

I also bought some extention tubes for CLOSE up shots (sooooooo cool)
T.T.F.N

An impressive “alternative” is a DLSR remote iPhone App from onOne Software, cfr. http://www.ononesoftware.com.

So easy a CAVEMAN can do it

This was so helpful. Everyone will be happy with it. Please make sure, if you don't have your camera manual, go to your camera's website and download the manual. Look up how to use the remote control. The manual has images which makes it so easy a caveman can do it. With this blog and your camera's manual you will be in all your pictures with your friends.

thank you thank you thank you! i had purchased this from ebay about a month ago hoping to use it when our family gets together today for thanksgiving, to do our own family christmas cards, there was a death in the family the day it arrived and i have been out of state, no internet, unable to figure it out…i thought i bought a dud. we got home yesterday and i looked your site up ... works like a charm! now if i could control my family with this remote ... lol

Sigh, the lack of wireless triggering was the biggest turn-off moving from D70 → D200.

If you are “stranded” with the Dxxx or Dx models, you need a special cable (MC-30 or compatible) for wired triggering. However, just found a sanely priced alternative for wireless triggering!

The flash triggers Yongnuo RF-602 actually can be used in “reverse” for triggering the camera. They come with a cable from the wireless receiver and inputs to the multi plug on the camera body. I plan to have one transmitter in the hot shoe on the camera, triggering flashes remote. Then, on another channel, using a second transmitter (in my hand) to send to the receiver that's cabled to the camera.

A pack of 2 transmitters, 3 receivers and a plethora of cables is less than USD 100, including shipping on eBay.

(…aiding for either a multi-setup with remote release + remote flash, or as a backup if the non-pocket-wizard-quality turns me down).

You may also use an universal IR remote

Some universal TV remotes can also be used to trigger the camera in place of an ML-L3 or RC-6. Clunky, but useful if you have multiple bodies and are too cheap to buy multiple remotes to keep alongside each body

Thank you for this comprehensive manual. It's useful and much better than the original. And I just know how to open the battery compartment.

MNL Girl

Your blog helped me big time as the remote didn't come with a more comprehensive manual.. so thank you again! I'll be using this on our beach trip this week.. kind regards! God bless

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Thank You!!

That helped a lot. Your instructions were FAR clearer then the ones that came with the remote!!

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Really Helpful

The instructions with the control are simply non existent. BUT now I can play to my hearts content, it's so easy

CHEERS

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Konica-Minolta 7D

I bought one about 5 months ago for my Konica-Minolta 7D with absolute no luck whatsoever. I kept the unit since I was getting a Sony A700 and was hoping it would work with the Sony, once again no luck.

The instructions that came with the unit are useless to say the least.

Has anybody actually been able to use it with either Sony or Konica-Minolta DSLRs?

If so I would greatly appreciate a bit of information of how to make the unit work on either camera.

Kind regards
Dieter

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@Dieter,
I do not think that the Konica-Minolta Dynax 7D has an infrared receiver. Without an infrared receiver on the camera, there is no way this unit will work.

The Sony A700 has an infrared receiver, and can be triggered wirelessly by the Sony RMT-DSLR1 remote commander (search eBay for Sony RMT-DSLR1). However, the Sony A700 is not listed in the compatibility chart, and probably uses a different infrared protocol than the legacy Konica-Minolta bodies.

However, for both the Dynax 7D and Sony A700, there are cabled solutions (Minolta RC-1000S / Sony RM-S1AM short cable, and Minolta RC-1000L / Sony RM-L1AM long cable). You may want to search eBay for a Sony shutter release that should work with your models. Some of those are wireless (using radio).

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Thank you - this has been extremely helpful

Love google and your post!

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Sony Alpha 55

For use with my Sony Alpha 55, I purchased a Jue Ying remote which has the same instructions and general case style (including hard-to-open CR2025 battery compartment). However, there are only two buttons, "S" and "2S". In addition, there is a large alpha "a" and the words "For SONY" printed in Sony Alpha orange.

This Sony-specific remote works fine with the Sony A55 and A33 cameras.

Because my remote's instructions list the same Sony and Konica/Minolta cameras as you list in your blog, I am guessing that your remote's KM buttons would also work with the Sony A55 and A33 cameras.

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Canon EOS Rebel T3 (1100D)

Does it work with Rebel T3 (EOS 1100D)? Is there any other cheap remotes for T3?

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@dana,
no, it will not work with the Canon EOS Rebel T3/1100D.

The Canon EOS Rebel T3/1100D does not have an IR port, so it will not work with any IR remote unit.

This means that you are limited to getting a wired remote, or a radio remote. Try these eBay searches: wired remote shutter release, and radio remote shutter release.

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rc-6 not working

I have bought new rc-6, it was working at shop to Canon 350D but at home it is not working to Canon 450D … please help me.

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@avtar s.,
the Canon RC-6 IR remote is listed as compatible with the Canon EOS 450D, and should work.

If it doesn't work, there may be a problem with either the RC-6, or the camera's IR port.

However, before contacting service, make sure you've set self-timer/remote mode on the camera, that you're positioned in front of the camera, and that there is a good battery in the remote.

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Pentax K-01 and IR-remote control

My RC-4 is an unbranded one.
Pentax K-01 can be added also as compatible.
Pressing the W/T button in the P (Pentax) area triggers focussing at the Pentax K-01 Camera.

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Pentax isDl

I have bought one of these remotes for my Pentax isDl and have had no luck! I have read and re re- read the manual to ensure I am on the correct settings but the camera doesn't respond to the remote. It's a listed compatible camera so I'm confused. Is there a way I could see if the remote is working at all? As in to see if the remote is not faulty

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